Rationing


Rationing
The artificial restriction of raw materials, goods or services. Rationing commonly occurs when governments fear a shortage and want to make sure people have access to necessities, such as after a natural disaster or during a war. Governments can also impose rationing in the face of failed policies such as central planning, or may be forced to use rationing as a result of shortages.

MARGIN: 0in 0in 10pt; mso-margin-top-alt: auto; mso-margin-bottom-alt: auto">For example, during World War II, the U.S. government imposed rationing on the country so that sufficient materials and production capabilities would be available to the military. It did not matter how much of an item an individual or family wanted or could afford to purchase; people were only allowed to purchase a limited amount specified by the government and controlled by ration coupons. Items including tires, gasoline, sugar, meat, butter and many others were subject to rationing.

MARGIN: 0in 0in 10pt; mso-margin-top-alt: auto; mso-margin-bottom-alt: auto">Rationing can lead to the creation of black markets for the rationed goods. Black markets allow individuals to use their allotment of a rationed good that they don’t need to obtain more of a rationed good that they do need.


Investment dictionary. . 2012.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Rationing —    Rationing of raw materials, foodstuff, and consumer goods went into effect during World War II starting with rubber and tire rationing in spring 1942. This was followed with some controls on gasoline in May 1942 primarily to save on rubber and …   Historical Dictionary of the Roosevelt–Truman Era

  • rationing — index control (restriction), distribution (apportionment), division (act of dividing) Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • rationing — (n.) restriction to limited allotments, as during wartime, 1918, from conditions in England during World War I, from prp. of RATION (Cf. ration) (v.) …   Etymology dictionary

  • Rationing — Gasoline ration stamps printed, but not used, as a result of the 1973 oil crisis Rationing is the controlled distribution of scarce resources, goods, or services. Rationing controls the size of the ration, one s allotted portion of the resources… …   Wikipedia

  • rationing — n [U] a system of limiting and sharing food, clothing, fuel, etc, especially in times of war. Rationing was introduced in Britain and the US during both world wars, and continued after World War II in Britain for several years. People were given… …   Universalium

  • rationing — n. 1) to introduce rationing 2) to end, terminate rationing 3) food; gasoline (AE), petrol (BE) rationing 4) emergency; wartime rationing * * * [ ræʃ(ə)nɪŋ] petrol (BE) rationing terminate rationing wartime rationing gasoline (AE) …   Combinatory dictionary

  • rationing — noun ADJECTIVE ▪ strict ▪ bread, credit, food, fuel, gas (AmE), petrol (BrE), etc. ▪ …   Collocations dictionary

  • rationing — Ⅰ. ration UK US /ˈræʃən/ noun [C] ► a limited amount of something that you are allowed to have when there is not much of it available: »Each family has to make do with a weekly ration of gas. »With ranchers reducing their herds because of high… …   Financial and business terms

  • rationing — ra|tion|ing [ˈræʃənıŋ] n [U] when the amount of food, petrol etc that people are allowed to have is limited by the government fuel/clothes/food etc rationing ▪ News of bread rationing created panic buying …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • rationing — [[t]ræ̱ʃənɪŋ[/t]] N UNCOUNT: usu with supp Rationing is the system of limiting the amount of food, water, petrol, or other necessary substances that each person is allowed to have or buy when there is not enough of them. The municipal authorities …   English dictionary


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